A reflection in learning

Johns [ edit ] Adaptation of the Johns reflective model Professor of nursing Christopher Johns designed a structured mode of reflection that provides a practitioner with a guide to gain greater understanding of his or her practice. Johns draws on the work of Barbara Carper to expand on the notion of "looking out" at a situation. It also helps us detect hegemonic assumptions—assumptions that we think are in our own best interests, but actually work against us in the long run. Our autobiography as a learner.

A reflection in learning

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A reflection in learning

It is the language of reflection that deepens our knowledge of who we are in relation to others in a community of learners. Why is reflection important for learning? What does the literature say about how reflection supports learning? Self-knowledge becomes an outcome of learning.

John Zubizaretta, in his insightful books on Learning Portfolios in higher education, describes the primary motive of a learning portfolio: Reflection Cycle Image above: Even if we were able to decrease our emphasis on speed and information and increase the possibilities for reflection, we still would have to give our students the kind of experience that would produce dreams-- experiences that engage their emotions.

In fact, stories engage all parts of the brain; Zull points out that learning is deepest when it engages the most parts of the brain. Jennifer Moon, the most recent researcher on reflective practice, provides the following definition: Reflection is a form of mental processing — like a form of thinking — that we use to fulfill a purpose or to achieve some anticipated outcome.

It is applied to relatively complicated or unstructured ideas for which there is not an obvious solution and is largely based on the further processing of knowledge and understanding and possibly emotions that we already possess based on Moon Moon points out that one of the defining characteristics of surface learning is that it does not involve reflection p.

She points out the conditions for reflection: Moon further points out the qualities of tasks that encourage reflection: Part of the reflective process is to have students tell stories about their experiences which brain research shows can help students embed these experiences into their long term memory.

Stories are products of reflection, but we do not usually hold onto them long enough to make them objects of reflection in their own right When we get into the habit of recording our stories, we can look at them again, attending to the meanings we have build into them and attending, as well, to our strategies of narrative description.

Our motivation for telling stories is to wrest meaning from experiences. Reflection does not always have to be in written form. For some students, reflections can be oral, shared with peers or teachers.

Setting the Tone for Reflection

With the addition of multimedia technologies, these stories can be captured, in either audio or video formats. Janice McDrury and Maxine Alteriotwo educators from New Zealand have written a book called Learning through Storytelling in which they outline their theory of storytelling as an effective learning tool.

They have linked the art of storytelling with reflective learning processes supported by the literature on both reflection and learning as well as making meaning through storytelling.

Reflection in Teacher Education pp. Case Studies in and on Educational Practice. Teachers College Press Zubizarreta, J. Anker Publishing Zubizarreta, J. Reflection cycle image source:Reflection in Learning Reflection is an important part of student learning and leadership development.

Staff have the responsibility to help students make connections between their curricular experiences, their curricular experiences, and their career aspirations.

Valuing Reflection

Reflection is also enhanced, however, when we ponder our learning with others. Reflection involves linking a current experience to previous learnings (a process called scaffolding).

Reflection also involves drawing forth cognitive and emotional information from several sources: visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and tactile. Journals, Reflection, and Learning A journal is a crucible for processing the raw material of experience in order to integrate it with existing knowledge and create new meaning.

Reflection is also enhanced, however, when we ponder our learning with others. Reflection involves linking a current experience to previous learnings (a process called scaffolding).

Reflection also involves drawing forth cognitive and emotional information from several sources: visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and . The Learning Cycle, developed by David Kolb, based Dewey, Piaget, and Lewin, is based on the belief that deep learning (learning for real comprehension) comes from a sequence of experience, reflection, abstraction, and active testing.

The Learning Cycle, developed by David Kolb, based Dewey, Piaget, and Lewin, is based on the belief that deep learning (learning for real comprehension) comes from a sequence of experience, reflection, abstraction, and active testing.

Why Reflect? - Reflection4Learning